Popular Devon tourist attraction is one of UK’s most haunted places

Paranormal activity: Man hears ‘voice’ from ‘haunted mirror’

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Sightings of spiritual figures around this Grade I-listed building near Totnes, continue to be circulated. In 2018, a group of teens shared images they had managed to capture of what appears to be the ghosts of two horses in the grounds. Several visitors have reported hearing screams in the area of the castle known as Pomeroy’s Leap.

According to legend, two brothers of the Pomeroy family, who originally owned the site, rode their steeds off the top of the castle to prevent being captured by their enemies.

Dressed in full armour, the siblings leapt to their deaths.

Despite its name, Berry Pomeroy Castle is actually a Tudor mansion that was built within the walls of an earlier castle during the late 15th century.

Situated near the village the ancient fortress is named after, the medieval building was owned by the Pomeroy family who had owned the land since the 11th century.

One of the last of its kind to be built in England, Berry Pomeroy Castle was bought by Edward Seymour from the Pomeroy family in 1547.

Seymour is most famous for being the brother of Jane Seymour, the third wife of King Henry VIII and uncle to King Edward VI.

But the castle’s rich history of famous inhabitants are more grisly, spine-tingling tales rather than happy ever afters.

Another story often heard when visitors set foot into the haunted Devon landmark is the ghosts of the White Lady and the Blue Lady.

The White Lady is thought to be the spirit of Margaret Pomeroy who is rumoured to have starved to death in the dungeons.

Her sister, Eleanor, who was jealous of her beauty and was in love with the same man, had the young woman imprisoned below St. Margaret’s tower.

Since then, her ghost is thought to float around the castle at night, but the story was proven not true when it was discovered there was no dungeon at the said location.

The only thing found beneath the tower was the remains of a late medieval gun placement.

As for the Blue Lady, her story is equally tragic. She is also believed to haunt the castle’s dungeon, luring guests to her corner.

Those who follow her calls are said to fall to their deaths.

Today the castle is still owned by the Duke of Somerset, though it is administered by English Heritage.

After lying in ruins for a hundred years, it has now become a popular tourist attraction among history buffs and ghost hunters.

The spooky reputation of Berry Pomeroy Castle, upholds among those who have dared to enter, with nearly 30 per cent of all TripAdvisor reviews mentioning ghosts.

One review on TripAdvisor reads: “Excellent little castle nestled away in lovely Devon woodland. Peaceful and not too busy on the day we went (but the cafe was shut…only downside). Audio guide was great, lots of detail about the structure and the lives of the previous inhabitants.”

Another person said: “Have been to Berry Pomeroy Castle for many years and it’s definitely haunted and saw the white lady back in 2019 at precisely 1.45am on the lawn near the pay hut.

“Have had many experiences here. It’s not haunted 24/7 but some will have experiences and some won’t.”

You can currently book for visits up to September 30. Tickets for the autumn will go on sale soon, with English Heritage members can enter for free.

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