Eerie but beautiful abandoned subways around the world


Slide 1 of 30: Hidden deep beneath the city streets, these abandoned, disused and forgotten subway stations are a fascinating window to the past. Some have been transformed into museums or used as film sets, while others slowly slip into oblivion. Take a look at these incredible abandoned stations and read the captivating stories behind them.
Slide 2 of 30: One of Madrid’s original eight metro stops and opened in 1919, Estación de Chamberí was closed in 1966. Unfortunately, the station was no longer able to accommodate longer, more modern trains.
Slide 3 of 30: Inspired by the look of the Parisian stations at the time, a lot of its original features have been preserved, including posters, benches and even turnstiles. In 2008 it reopened as a museum with many period features restored to offer a realistic portrayal of life in the 1920s. The museum is currently closed due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic but check the website for updates.
Slide 4 of 30: Located between Saint-Denis and Republique stations, Saint-Martin closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. Although it briefly opened after the war, it was subsequently closed again due to its close proximity to Saint-Denis station. In the past it has been used as a homeless shelter as well as for publicity events. Most of the walls of Saint-Martin are covered in graffiti, however, some sections are said to still have original posters from the 1930s on their walls.

Slide 5 of 30: The first terminus for Paris’ Métro line 10, Croix Rouge was only open between 1923 and 1939. It never reopened after the Second World War and has since fallen into disrepair. Interestingly, all 12 Paris Métro stations that closed before the war have either been abandoned, turning into stations fantômes (ghost stations) or repurposed.
Slide 6 of 30: Part of Porte des Lilas station in Paris closed in 1929 but it's been a popular filming location since the 1970s. It was last open to the public in 2017, during European Heritage Days, when visitors could tour the platforms and see the restored subways cars.
Slide 7 of 30: Part of the station still remains operational and the disused platforms have appeared in films like Amélie and Julie & Julia. During shoots, producers are free to change all of the decor and even the name of the station. But it doesn't come cheap – 10 hours of filming costs just over $17,500.
Slide 8 of 30: One of London’s most famous ghost stations, Aldwych tube station was part of a spur on the Piccadilly line and closed in 1994. The crimson-tiled entrance is still visible from the Strand and below street level, the original lobby, wooden-paneled elevators and vintage posters are preserved.
Slide 9 of 30: The station is a popular filming location, appearing in films like V for Vendetta, 28 Weeks Later and Darkest Hour. The London Transport Museum usually runs tours of the station but these have been temporarily suspended due to COVID-19. Check the website for updates.

Slide 10 of 30: Although Euston remains one of London’s busiest stations, linking several tube, overground and rail lines, not many know that there’s a whole system of disused tunnels hiding underground.
Slide 11 of 30: When the mainline station was rebuilt in the 1960s along with the then-new Victoria line, the old connecting passageways, some of the tunnels and ticket hall became redundant. The London Transport Museum usually runs regular tours but these have been postponed due to COVID-19. Check the website for updates.
Slide 12 of 30: This central London station, located on the Piccadilly line, was only in operation for 25 years. Located in Mayfair, between Dover Street (now called Green Park) and Hyde Park Corner, it was little-used and trains often passed through without stopping.
Slide 13 of 30: During the Second World War it was transformed into the Railway Executive Committee's bomb-proof shelter and Prime Minister Winston Churchill and his War Cabinet used it as a shelter during the height of the Blitz. Part of the station’s red terracotta tile façade is still visible from Down Street.
Slide 14 of 30: Unknown to most commuters using the London Underground system, there’s a line running between Paddington Station and Whitechapel, but it’s not meant for people. The Post Office Railway, also known as Mail Rail, helped mail travel between the two sorting offices from 1927 to 2003. A museum opened in 2017, allowing visitors to ride the Mail Rail carriages through the narrow tunnels. It's currently closed due to COVID-19 – check out the website for updates and its virtual ride along the route. Take a look at more museums and galleries you can visit at home.

Slide 15 of 30: As downtown congestion increased rapidly in the first quarter of the 20th century, the construction of the Cincinnati Subway began in the early 1900s. However, escalating costs, the collapse of funding due to political uncertainty and the Great Depression meant that the project was subsequently abandoned. In 1928 it was indefinitely canceled and there have been no plans to revive it since. Today it is the largest abandoned subway tunnel system in the United States.
Slide 16 of 30: Just like all the other subway systems built by the Soviet Union, Kiev’s metro system was never intended to just transport commuters from A to B. Several nuclear-proof tunnels, bunkers and warehouses are hidden among the rest of the tunnels. Only visited by urban explorers, it’s unclear how far these tunnels stretch, where exactly they lead to and how they can be accessed. Take a look at these striking communist remains around the world.
Slide 17 of 30: Did you know that the current Los Angeles subway system isn’t the first one the city has ever had? The original Subway Terminal Building, now known as Metro 417, was the Red Car subway terminal and served more than 65,000 commuters during the 1940s.
Slide 18 of 30: Below the building, the tracks, platforms and even the signage still remains. But visitors are no longer allowed as the building above has been transformed into luxury apartments.
Slide 19 of 30: Constructed in the 1980s, Antwerp’s subterranean tunnels were supposed to be served by trams, which would later be upgraded to a full rapid transit system. Although much of Antwerp’s Premetro still runs today, tunnels connecting the city center with the eastern suburbs were never finished due to a lack of funding.
Slide 20 of 30: One of the 28 original stations on the first subway line in Manhattan, Worth Street Station opened in 1904. Although the platforms at this station were lengthened twice, it was still not enough to accommodate the growing number of commuters and it was closed in 1957. Trains running between Canal Street and Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall still pass through the station and its graffiti-covered walls.
Slide 21 of 30: Built as a terminus for local trains running on the IND Fulton Street Line, the station was open for 10 years, between 1936 and 1946. Today it’s better known as the New York Transit Museum. The museum is currently closed due to COVID-19; check the website for updates.
Slide 22 of 30: Two fully-powered and operational subway tracks still remain as do seven preserved railcars, including the first wooden cars from 1908 and the 1950s stock. Now take a look inside America's abandoned theme parks.
Slide 23 of 30: First opened in 1913, this station has been through a series of changes. Now a part of the Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall/Chambers Street station complex, only two platforms remain – a surviving east side wall platform and a destroyed west side platform. One of the platforms that faces the old Chambers Street platform is still in use by the downtown J & M trains on weekdays.
Slide 24 of 30: Commissioned by the 32nd US President Franklin D. Roosevelt, this station, hidden below the Waldorf Astoria hotel, was never intended to be open to the public. An extension of Grand Central Station, it was built to help Roosevelt keep his polio diagnosis private while commuting between New York and Washington DC.
Slide 25 of 30: Roosevelt's private train car hasn’t moved since his death in 1945 but rumors swirl that the tracks are still in use by commanders-in-chief. These are the eeriest ghost towns in America.
Slide 26 of 30: Hiding below the Bay station main platform is an abandoned platform that was only in use for six months in 1966. The platform was part of a failed interlining experiment.
Slide 27 of 30: Much of the infrastructure is still present and although the platform isn’t usually accessible, it has been open to the public on various events, including Doors Open Toronto in 2007, 2013 and 2018. Take a look at Canada's eeriest ghost towns.
Slide 28 of 30: Part of Sheung Wan station, the Rumsey Station platforms were constructed in the 1970s as the southern terminus of the East Kowloon Line. However, the plans quickly changed mid-project. While the platforms were finished, the tracks were never laid so they have never been used. Today, they serve as a passageway between the concourse and the open platforms, near Exit E.
Slide 29 of 30: Arguably one of the world’s most famous ghost stations, New York City’s City Hall station is exceptionally beautiful with brass chandeliers, colored glass tile work and skylights.
Slide 30 of 30: The station opened in 1904 as part of the IRT Lexington Avenue Line but was subsequently closed in 1945 due to short platforms. New York Transit Museum usually runs regular tours of the station but they have been temporarily suspended due to COVID-19; check the website for updates.

Stopped in their tracks

Estación de Chamberí, Madrid, Spain

Estación de Chamberí, Madrid, Spain

Inspired by the look of the Parisian stations at the time, a lot of its original features have been preserved, including posters, benches and even turnstiles. In 2008 it reopened as a museum with many period features restored to offer a realistic portrayal of life in the 1920s. The museum is currently closed due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic but check the website for updates.

Saint-Martin, Paris, France

Croix Rouge, Paris, France

Porte des Lilas, Paris, France

Porte des Lilas, Paris, France

Part of the station still remains operational and the disused platforms have appeared in films like Amélie and Julie & Julia. During shoots, producers are free to change all of the decor and even the name of the station. But it doesn’t come cheap – 10 hours of filming costs just over $17,500.

Aldwych, London, UK

Aldwych, London, UK

The station is a popular filming location, appearing in films like V for Vendetta, 28 Weeks Later and Darkest Hour. The London Transport Museum usually runs tours of the station but these have been temporarily suspended due to COVID-19. Check the website for updates.

Disused tunnels at Euston, London, UK

Disused tunnels at Euston, London, UK

When the mainline station was rebuilt in the 1960s along with the then-new Victoria line, the old connecting passageways, some of the tunnels and ticket hall became redundant. The London Transport Museum usually runs regular tours but these have been postponed due to COVID-19. Check the website for updates.

Down Street, London, UK

Down Street, London, UK

Mail Rail, London, UK

Unknown to most commuters using the London Underground system, there’s a line running between Paddington Station and Whitechapel, but it’s not meant for people. The Post Office Railway, also known as Mail Rail, helped mail travel between the two sorting offices from 1927 to 2003. A museum opened in 2017, allowing visitors to ride the Mail Rail carriages through the narrow tunnels. It’s currently closed due to COVID-19 – check out the website for updates and its virtual ride along the route. Take a look at more museums and galleries you can visit at home.

Cincinnati subway, USA

Unused tunnels in Kiev metro system, Ukraine

Just like all the other subway systems built by the Soviet Union, Kiev’s metro system was never intended to just transport commuters from A to B. Several nuclear-proof tunnels, bunkers and warehouses are hidden among the rest of the tunnels. Only visited by urban explorers, it’s unclear how far these tunnels stretch, where exactly they lead to and how they can be accessed. Take a look at these striking communist remains around the world.

Old Los Angeles subway system, USA

Old Los Angeles subway system, USA

Antwerp Premetro, Belgium

Worth Street Station, New York City, USA

Court Street Station, New York City, USA

Built as a terminus for local trains running on the IND Fulton Street Line, the station was open for 10 years, between 1936 and 1946. Today it’s better known as the New York Transit Museum. The museum is currently closed due to COVID-19; check the website for updates.

Court Street Station, New York City, USA

Two fully-powered and operational subway tracks still remain as do seven preserved railcars, including the first wooden cars from 1908 and the 1950s stock. Now take a look inside America’s abandoned theme parks.

Chambers Street, New York City, USA

Waldorf Astoria, New York City, USA

Waldorf Astoria, New York City, USA

Roosevelt’s private train car hasn’t moved since his death in 1945 but rumors swirl that the tracks are still in use by commanders-in-chief. These are the eeriest ghost towns in America.

Lower Bay, Toronto, Canada

Lower Bay, Toronto, Canada

Much of the infrastructure is still present and although the platform isn’t usually accessible, it has been open to the public on various events, including Doors Open Toronto in 2007, 2013 and 2018. Take a look at Canada’s eeriest ghost towns.

Rumsey Station, Hong Kong

City Hall, New York City, USA

City Hall, New York City, USA

The station opened in 1904 as part of the IRT Lexington Avenue Line but was subsequently closed in 1945 due to short platforms. New York Transit Museum usually runs regular tours of the station but they have been temporarily suspended due to COVID-19; check the website for updates.

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